Homegrown Local Food Cooperative Orlando, FL

Want to start off the New Year Healthy?

Cooking, Growing, Healthy activities, Healthy Food, Local Orlando Businesses, Organic Herbs and Teas, Orlando News and Events

Homegrown Local Food Cooperative Orlando, FL

Homegrown Local Food Cooperative Orlando, FL

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HOMEGROWN LOCAL FOOD COOPERATIVE

Homegrown Local Food Cooperative is your resource for locally grown organic produce, pastured eggs and meats, raw dairy, honey and a variety of artisanal goods for the home and garden.

Homegrown goods are available every week through our Signature Online Farmer’s Market.  Simply log in, shop and pick-up your local goods at our boutique farm store on Orange Avenue where Ivanhoe and Health Villages connect.

Our local Farmer’s list what’s growing each week and you get to pick what farm fresh goodies you want and, they are harvested just for you!

Our local Artisans cook and prepare to order what you have requested.

Quality and transparency are important at Homegrown, and you can shop with ease, knowing that we are looking out for the best tasting, healthiest, most nutritionally packed, unadulterated, local food available.  At Homegrown our goal is to source the best quality food grown as close to home as possible.
Our produce is grown without pesticides, fungicides, or synthetic fertilizers and never from GMO seeds!  Our animal products come from animals who are treated humanely and do not receive routine hormones or antibiotics.  Our artisanal  food products are made without preservatives or artificial ingredients.  Our artisanal home products are made without parabens or sulfates.  Our garden products come from our local organic farmers.

Each product listed at our Online Farmer’s Market is identified by the farm, kitchen or craftsman who is creating the unique offering.  To learn more about our Producers, visit the Producers section.

Online Farmer’s Market Hours:Tuesday at 9am through Friday at 9am

Boutique Farm Store Hours:
Saturday and Sunday from noon until 4:00pm and Monday from 2:00pm until 7:00pm

We accept cash, check, ebt and all major credit cards. 

http://www.homegrowncoop.org/

TANGERINE SHERBET

TANGERINE SHERBET

Cooking, Growing, Healthy activities, Healthy Food, Local Orlando Businesses, Organic Herbs and Teas, Uncategorized

We came across some yummy looking tangerines and decided to make some sherbet! We adapted from this recipe here from vanillaandbean.com, which they adapted from Alton Brown’s recipe here to make it vegan. See, it’s all about making a recipe your own!

Ingredients:

  • 2 Cups Orange Juice, fresh-squeezed tangerines. This will require 2-3 lbs of oranges. Refrigerate the oranges overnight if possible.
  • 1 Tbsp Lemon Juice
  • 1 Cup Granulated Cane Sugar
  • ⅛ tsp Sea Salt
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract
  • 1¾ C, or 13.6 oz can full fat coconut milk, refrigerated overnight
  • 2 Tbs Orange Zest, 2 small oranges

Directions:

  1. The night before making the sherbet, place the oranges and coconut milk in the refrigerator. Place the ice cream maker’s freezer bowl in the freezer.
  2. In a high speed blender (or a food processor), blend the orange juice, lemon juice, sugar, salt, vanilla extract, and coconut milk until the sugar is dissolved. Strain into a large bowl. Add the orange zest. Stir.
  3. Refrigerate until mixture is 40F or less (I refrigerated mine overnight to reach appropriate temperature).
  4. Process mixture in an ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s directions. When finished, the sherbet will be like soft-serve (mine took 25 minutes).
  5. While the sherbet is processing, line a storage container with parchment paper and place in the freezer.
  6. Spoon the sherbet into the storage container making sure to redistribute the zest evenly as it tends to get stuck and clump up on the mixer attachment.
  7. Place a piece of parchment paper directly on the surface of the Sherbet and freeze until desired consistency. I freeze mine overnight, but a softer serve consistency can be enjoyed in about three hours.
  8. Serve in a bowl or cone.
  9. Store for up to two weeks in the covered container in the freezer.

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http://dandelion.kitchen/portfolio/tangerine-sherbet/

Books to live by

BOOKS TO LIVE BY

Cooking, Growing, Healthy Food, Inspiration, Organic Herbs and Teas

by: Chef Mark Thompson

It’s no secret to anyone that knows me that I love books. A lot. Real books – printed books that I can hold, flip through and put on my bookshelves. Old school. No e-books for me. But if thats your thing, don’t let me stop you.

Culinary books are a great resource – for techniques, flavor combinations, ideas and inspiration. Oh, and recipes. There are tons of tomes out there, but these are my personal favorites when it comes to plant-based cooking.

TOP THREE

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The Vegetarian Flavor Bible

The Essential Guide to Culinary Creativity with Vegetables, Fruits, Grains, Legumes, Nuts, Seeds, and More, Based On the Culinary Wisdom of Leading American Chefs

by Karen Page

That’s one heck of a subtitle. But it’s true. This book has been indispensable to me. Hands down the book I use the most often. It was preceded by Culinary Artistry (I bought three copies, because friends kept ‘borrowing’!), then an updated and expanded version was released, The Flavor Bible. This vegetarian version came out in 2014. The bulk of the book is dedicated to ingredient matches and affinities. Want to know what goes with mangoes? It’s there. Really want to know? Everything from almonds to yuzu. Classic and clever pairings garnered from the input of some of the best chefs in America. As well as methods of preparation, seasonality, flavor profiles, sample dish ideas, nutritional profile, botanical relatives and tips. Also, there is a fascinating timeline of vegetarian history, great quotes, information on eating plant-based, menus from top restaurants and more. Learn about it, and buy it here.

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Ratio

The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking

by Michael Ruhlman

A New York Times bestseller, Ratio, like the Flavor Bible, is another book to help break beyond recipes and find a new freedom in cooking. Recipes, of course, are helpful, especially when starting out or experimenting with new cuisines. However, knowing a basic ratio makes cooking easier and more intuitive. For example, a classic vinaigrette is 3 parts oil to 1 part vinegar. Where you go from there is completely up to you (and half the fun!). Oil? The standard is olive. But what about avocado or hazelnut or sesame? Instead of the traditional white wine vinegar, try sherry, raspberry or balsamic. Or go crazy and use lemon juice! It’s your world now. Add in some salt and pepper, it’s that easy. Other common additions would be shallots, dijon mustard and herbs. Just the beginning… There are 32 other ratios with countless variations. While not a vegetarian book, it is incredibly helpful nonetheless.

This book is also available as an app. Which, even given my affinity for books, I will admit is pretty handy. Ruhlman also has a very informative blog, as well as many other great books. I like them all, including the ones having nothing at all to do with cooking. Such as The Elements of Cooking, Ruhlman’s Twenty, The Making of a Chef, House, Walking on Water and Wooden Boats. You can find it all here.

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How to Cook Everything Vegetarian

Simple Meatless Recipes for Great Food

by Mark Bittman

I’ve liked Mark Bittman for some time now. Up until recently he was a columnist with the New York Times, but has since left to work with a vegan startup. He is also an outspoken commentator on our broken food system appearing often on news programs, in documentaries and writing other books like Food Matters. His column, The Minimalist, was known for straightforward, simple recipes. This volume, one of a series, carries on that theme. This is a more traditional cookbook, but a massive one. And while there are over 2,000 recipes, there are also variations and substitutions and techniques to help facilitate spontaneous and seasonal cooking. The recipes run the gamut of soups, salads, breads, desserts, grains and way more. My personal favorite is the section on spices, condiments and sauces. It’s a great way to build up your pantry with natural, homemade goodness, without all the chemicals and superfluous ingredients found in mass market convenience products. With this book, you can make your own pesto, ketchup, eggless mayo, mustard, vegan fish sauce, barbeque sauce and mix your own curry powder, chili powder, garam masala and tons more.

This book is also available as an app, which makes a convenient, searchable, portable companion. Other books I like by Bittman include the aforementioned Food Matters, as well as VB6 and Kitchen Express (not entirely plant-based, but easily customizable). For more information, visit his website here.

CHEFS & RESTAURANTS

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Crossroads

Extraordinary Recipes from the Restaurant That is Reinventing Vegan Cuisine

by Tal Ronnen with Scot Jones and Serafina Magnussen

Just know this – Bill Clinton, Paul McCartney and Jay-Z are all fans of Ronnen. So, you don’t really need me to tell you. But I will anyway. This is vegan food taken to the highest level. Primarily Mediterranean, it is beautiful just to peruse, but there is plenty here that you could make at home. The first thing I did was make his simple, but tasty Walnut Parmesan. Some very interesting flavors and a section on basics, with recipes for almond Greek yogurt, cashew cream, vegetable stocks and a demi-glace that is next up on my hit list. He also has another book, The Conscious Cook, which is also worth checking out.

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Dirt Candy: A Cookbook

Flavor-forward Food from the Upstart New York City Vegetarian Restaurant

by Amanda Cohen & Ryan Dunlavey with Grady Hendrix

My new favorite cookbook. Funny, clever and filled with great recipes, ideas and techniques. Written in graphic novel form, it is part memoir, a history of her NY restaurant, and a cookbook all in one. Learn the trials of opening a restaurant and how to make Smoked Corn Dumplings or Huitlacoche Cream. What I like most is ideas for components to reinforce and add extra layers of flavor. For example, her recipe for Roasted Carrot Buns also includes a carrot & cucumber salad, carrot hoisin and a carrot halvah garnish to really bring out the carrot flavor in different ways and textures.

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The Accidental Vegetarian

Delicious Food Without Meat

By Simon Rimmer

The chef at the Greens, in Manchester, England, Simon Rimmer has put together this tasty collection of dishes that could please anyone, omnivores included. Pulling inspiration from around the globe, there are dishes with Thai, Indian, Japanese, Middle Eastern and Italian influences. Most of the dishes are simple enough even for a weeknight, but there are plenty to impress at your next dinner party as well. Samples include Leek & Potato Rosti, Phyllo Strudel with Port and Eggplant Tikka Masala.

DIGGING DEEPER

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The Omnivore’s Dilemma

A Natural History of Four Meals

by Michael Pollan

Basically an exposé of what it takes to get food on your plate. An attempt to answer the question, “What should we eat?” Delves into the benefits and problems with organic production, fast food, the meat industry, and foraging. A fascinating look into a broken system. The book earned Pollan a James Beard Award. There is also a young readers version available. Also great is In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto and I also enjoyed Second Nature: A Gardener’s Education.

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The China Study

Startling Implications for Diet, Weight Loss and Long-Term Health

by T. Colin Campbell, PHD and Thomas M. Campbell, MD

An eye-opening look at the effect our diet has on every facet of our health. The book is based on the most comprehensive study of nutrition ever conducted. The main focus is the correlation between animal protein consumption and chronic illnesses. It can be a bit tedious, but the information is incredible. The study is featured in the film Forks Over Knives.

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Cooking

600 Recipes, 1500 Photographs, One Kitchen Education

by James Peterson

Somehow this guy seems to know everything about cooking. I mean, he did teach for seventeen years and write the advanced curriculum for The French Culinary Institute. So there’s that. He also has a degree in chemistry. He’s also written over a dozen books. This is the culmination of all of them, in one convenient package. It won a James Beard Award, as have several of his others. This is not all plant-based cooking, this is all cooking. So if you would be offended at pictures on trussing a veal roast, skip it. If you want to learn how to make concassée, Borscht, grill zucchini, and find out what the heck herbs de Provence is, then this is the book for you.

http://dandelion.kitchen/portfolio/books-to-live-by/

Bike repair stations around Orlando

Bicycling around Orlando

Bicycling, Healthy activities, Local Orlando Businesses, Orlando News and Events, Uncategorized

Orlando is making it easier to bike around town. One new feature are the new bike repair stations throughout Orlando that include air pumps, screwdrivers, wrenches, tire tools, etc.

Bike repair stations around Orlando

Bike repair stations around Orlando

 

Bike Repair Stations around Orlando: Cady Way Trail near Herndon Avenue; Orlando Urban Trail near Ferris Avenue and Lake Highland Drive; east end of Lake Underhill Path near boat ramp; and the city parking garage behind City Hall, downtown.

Juice Bike Sharing: Great way to get around town

 

You can’t miss them they are everywhere and bright orange.

There is nothing better than seeing lots of groups of renters on Orlando City Soccer or Magic Game Days, big events downtown, heading to Sunday brunch, etc.

Rent by the minute, hour, month, year, etc.

To learn more: https://orlando.socialbicycles.com/

Juice Bike Share Orlando

Juice Bike Share Orlando

 

Orlando’s new Lake Druid Park. It is the newest park in Orlando and features a mountain-bike “pump track” and trail through a wooded area. The park opened Oct. 31, 2015.

Here is a video on YouTube so you can see the layout of the track:

We will continue to add updates about biking around Orlando, so please check back.

Now, some crunchy granola to add some energy to your day!

HOMEMADE AUTUMN GRANOLA

Cooking, Healthy activities, Healthy Food

adapted from The Minimalist Baker

Granola is great to have ready to go in the kitchen. It’s great by itself, on ice cream, yogurt, mixed with your favorite cereal, take some on a hike or for a work snack – really the possibilities are limitless. You can also make it seasonal, based on what you have in the kitchen already or just based on the flavors you like. We made this one into an autumn-y blend, just for fun! Feel free to adapt as you would like. We used almonds and walnuts as our nut blend, but peanuts or cashews work just as well. It’s best to use the raw versions, if they are already roasted they will burn in the oven. The chia seeds, flax meal (or flax seeds), cinnamon, nutmeg, and sweet potato puree are all things we had already and wanted to use. Other good ingredient options are coconut, raisins, craisins, or any kind of dried fruit, be it mango, pineapple, banana, or apple. Follow your heart!

Ingredients:

  • sweet potato puree – ½ cup, which is less than one sweet potato
  • oats – 3 cups
  • almonds & walnuts – 1.5 cups, chopped coarsely
  • chia seeds – 2 tbsp
  • flax meal – 2 tbsp
  • coconut sugar (can also use white or cane sugar) – 3 tbsp
  • kosher salt (or sea salt) – ¼ tbsp
  • cinnamon – ½ tbsp
  • nutmeg – ¼ tsp
  • coconut oil – ¼ cup, melted (we used unrefined, it has less coconut flavor)
  • maple syrup – 1/3 cup (agave works also, but doesn’t have that yummy maple flavor!)
  • zante currants – ¼ cup

Directions:

To make the sweet potato puree: Bake a whole sweet potato at 375 degrees until tender. Let cool, scoop out flesh, and puree in your blender. Any extra can of course be eaten!

For granola: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl, mix together all dry ingredients except currants (or any dried fruit & raisins) – nuts, seeds, oats, salt, spices, sugar. In a separate bowl, mix together the sweet potato puree, maple syrup, and coconut oil. Combine into one bowl, and mix them together thoroughly. Spread the mixture into an even single layer on two baking sheets. Cook for 10 minutes, then rotate and switch shelves, also add currants or dried fruit on top at this point. Back in the oven for 10-15 more minutes. Check frequently to make sure it’s not burning – it should be toasted and dried out, but not burnt. When finished, remove from oven and let cool until room temperature, then transfer to your desired container. This will last at least a week at room temp, or you can freeze some to last longer, up to six months.

Mixing everything together ensures consistency in flavor.

Mixing everything together ensures consistency in flavor.

 

Ready for the oven!

Ready for the oven!

Now, some crunchy granola to add some energy to your day!

Now, some crunchy granola to add some energy to your day!

http://dandelion.kitchen/portfolio/homemade-autumn-granola/

Elderberry

Flowers and berries in modern herbal medicine: Elderberry

Growing, Healthy activities, Healthy Food, Organic Herbs and Teas

Materia Medica: Elder

Common names: Elderberry

Latin name: Sambucus nigra var. canadensis

Parts used: Flowers and berries in modern herbal medicine, all parts historically.

Action: The flowers are a wonderful diaphoretic! Fevers are the body’s way of fighting off infections, so we don’t always want to lessen a fever, unless it’s either too high or has been going on too long. For a fever they’re beautiful in a tea or even in the bath, but tinctures will work well too.

Elderberry

Elderberry

Elderberries are antiviral and are an immunomodulator, which means they help the body balance to whatever level of action the immune system needs to fight infections. The berries make a lovely tincture, syrup, or elixir (combination of the two!) to prevent infections, and when taken during acute infections can lessen the infection’s severity. You can dry the berries too and add them to teas, they’re in our Heart Chakra blend, as well as the Everyday Wellness!

Elderberry plant

Elderberry plant

Once you can identify elder, and are aware of its healing properties, you’ll see it everywhere! Highway ditches, roadside creeks, your backyard! It’s a shrub and not a tree, and if you see one in the wild you’ll probably see 50! It prefers wet feet, which is easy to get in rainy Florida, and as of the last few years has taken to flowering almost year round! We’re lucky to have an elder shrub growing in the Dandelion garden and it is one of the happiest cultivated elders around! Tall, prolific flowers and berries, and keeps both its neighboring human and bird population very happy (the birds eat the berries too!).

I love to use elder daily in the wintertime, when everyone around me is full of cooties. It makes a beautiful and delicious preventative drink, and is was from inspiration from the elder that created the Everyday Wellness herbal tea blend at Dandelion!

Elder really is a pharmacy within a plant, and a tasty one too! Please enjoy these links to learn more about elder from some brilliant teachers:

Kiva Rose’s elder monograph

Rosemary Gladstar’s Garden Wisdoms: Elder Medicine

Jim McDonald’s Elder monograph

Eat The Weeds: Elderberries: Red, White, and Blue

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Organic Urban Gardening In Orlando, Florida

Cooking, Growing, Healthy Food, Uncategorized

On this blog, The Dandelion Community is sharing stories from urban organic farmers to help those who want to add fresh vegetables to their daily meals at home, and those who are thinking about going even bigger by contributing to local restaurants, co-ops, and famers’ markets.

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Photo Caption: Mint growing in soil at Southern Urban Gardens. They trim often to ensure continuous growth throughout the year.

The biggest challenges associated with organic urban gardening include finding space to grow enough food to feed a family. Much like gardeners all over the world, they must also find a way to cope with local environmental conditions such as weather and access to clean water and soil.

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Photo Caption: Constantly developing seedlings is necessary to support the growth needed to grow daily vegetables for meals.

Here is a story of Ralph Holweck and Gail Tyree from Southern Urban Gardens in Orlando, Florida. They have been organic gardening seriously for several years and have found solutions for overcoming the challenges of space, heat, water, and soil, so they can produce vegetables for their own table and grow enough extra vegetables to supply two local co-ops.

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Photo Caption: Organic aeroponic “Tower Garden” used by Southern Urban Gardens supports their family and two local co-ops with leafy vegetables throughout the year.

Gail and Ralph currently combine an aeroponic growing system and soil-based gardening to get the best results. Ralph and Gail spent a lot of time researching the best methods of urban gardening and started out slowly so they would not get overwhelmed and quit. They continue to find better ways to get more vegetables within the small space of their backyard.

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Photo Caption: Ralph and Gail found suitable organic seeds to grow healthy and great tasting bell peppers in their tower garden.

They made a decision to use their tower garden for the steady production of leafy vegetables as it reduces the amount of space needed and is easy enough to manage without needing a greenhouse. Finding the right varieties of vegetables that will grow in the heat and tower garden is a challenge. However, Gail and Ralph learned that urban gardening is a lot like the rest of life. You have good days with wonderful leafy vegetables for a daily salad. Then, there are bad days in which the heat is too much for the seedlings they choose to plant that week. Or, to know how to have enough seedlings growing constantly so you will enjoy vegetables daily.

Yet, Ralph and Gail seem to thrive on these little challenges and find ways to make it work. They both agree that there is nothing better than having organic vegetables to set upon their table day in and day out.

To accommodate the heat in Orlando, Gail and Ralph have added a reflective gardening shade cloth over the towers. They found that it is worth the extra money, in comparison, to the performance of typical gardening shade covers.

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Photo Caption: Gail and Ralph invested in reflective gardening shades in order to be able to grow veggies throughout the summer.

Gail and Ralph put a lot of effort towards developing the right soil mixture to grow additional plants that are not suited for the tower gardens. Due to the unusual heat throughout October of this year, Southern Urban Gardens has just started to plant additional vegetables in the soil area of the garden. This area in their yard is finally seeing the cooler nights that are the right temperature for growing in soil. They are looking forward to digging in the soil and seeing what varieties of vegetables successfully grow this year, as compared to last year.

Photo caption for the two images below: Gail loves nothing better than walking out in the soil section of their garden, in the morning, to find the red cranberry hibiscus in full bloom. Days like this make the work seem more like a labor of love.urbanlr5urbanlr7

Ralph and Gail of Southern Urban Gardens are more than willing to share their stories of urban farming and show you how you can benefit by using a mix of aeroponic systems and soil gardening to enjoy fresh, organic vegetables almost every day of the year.  Southern Urban Gardens sell the “Tower Garden” (by Juice Plus) systems.  We (**or Dandelion**) purchased a system from them and Ralph and Gail were extremely helpful in educating and helping us get setup to have a running start.   If you’re interested in organic hydroponic gardening, contact Southern Urban Gardens through Ralph at rdholweck@gmail.com, or call at (407) 247-3843.